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Séminaire de l’Idemec

Séminaire de l'Idemec

Vendredi 11 octobre 2019
14:00-16:00 salle PAF MMSH, Aix en Provence

Cycle — Méditerranée(s) connectée(s) — #2

A sea of scales:region formation between Sicily and Tunisia since World War II

Invité
- Naor BEN-YEHOYADA (Columbia University).

à venir :

#3 le 18 octobre. Michel PERALDI (CNRS).
Les capitalismes de paria, une histoire méditerranéenne ?

Abstract :
This talk follows the Mediterranean’s resurfacing as a transnational region since World War II. I show how Sicilian poaching in North African fishing grounds transformed transnational political action, imaginaries, and relations in the central Mediterranean : how Sicilians and Tunisians came to regard each other as related. I recount this process from the deck of a fishing boat from the fleet of Mazara del Vallo in south-western Sicily. From the trawler’s deck, I focus on Mazara’s turbulent mid-20th Century history : from a relatively unimportant viticulture town to a central scene in Fish Wars, irregular migration, a trans-Mediterranean gas pipeline, and the rising importance of the Mediterranean in Italian politics since the 1970s. To examine the various ways in which idioms of relatedness form transnational imaginaries and political processes, I show how Sicilians and Tunisians have used idioms of kinship and affinity across difference and multiple scales to form their transnational political relations across the Mediterranean. I show how the modularity, specificity, historical depth, and incorporation of relationship across difference, which such idioms offer, played a role in a segmentary process through which the central Mediterranean re-emerged as a palpable scene of politics. Through this analysis, I argue for an historical anthropology of the re-emergence of the Mediterranean as a transnational region in modern times.

Naor Ben-Yehoyada (PhD Harvard, 2011) is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Columbia University. He specializes in maritime, political, and historical anthropology, specifically the maritime aspect of Israeli-Palestinian history and post-WWII region formation processes between Sicily and Tunisia.